Heading in the right direction


We need to look deeper into our hearts and minds to really discover what we want from our future. A quick scan will more than likely miss what we are truly thinking. And that’s when we head off in the wrong direction.
The direction we take can impact us for longer than we want. An entire lifetime. But how do know what direction is really right for us?

There is normally one path that shines brighter than all the others. This is the obvious path. Or is it?

We will only know if we are on the right path once we have cleared our minds of everything else except for the path that lays ahead, and are certain there is no other way forward.


Once we know the right path, there is no sense in wasting time and procrastinating about the choice we are about to make.

Take that step into the right direction, your heart and mind will thank you forever.

Renée Geyer – Heading in the right direction

The Road Less Traveled

With another ride all planned out for the day, I headed down the peninsula and towards a ride that always makes me wonder why I keep attempting it on a regular basis. Arthur’s Seat is a 4.5 km ride that ensures my legs are screaming for mercy, half way up. It’s at that point I keep asking myself. Why?

The reason I keep pushing myself up the hill is for the views from the top, and they are spectacular. No matter what the weather, rain or shine, the pain from the ride always seems worthwhile. Well, in my mind it seems worth the effort.

 

So on this particular ride, I decided to take an alternate route home, one which I had only ridden once, and it was with another rider who knew the area like the back of his hand. With a certain clarity, I headed down the back roads that I thought would eventually take me back to the main road and to some semi flat tracks.

The trip back down should have taken no longer than 15 minutes, so when I was still riding along a road that didn’t look very familiar, I did what most men would do, keep going until a sign post came by to look for further directions.

I knew I was well off the beaten track after another 45 minutes, but the views on both sides of the road were well worth the pedal power, and the roads were all rolling  hills, so I assumed the remainder of the trip home would have similar gradients. How wrong could I have been?

After finally finding a road name that was very familiar, I headed in the direction of home, having already been out on the road for over 90 minutes, so I estimated another 60 minutes on the road. Another bad judgment call.

The next two hours saw me riding through some of the toughest and longest hills I had cycled through in a long while.  With every turn, the road continued to climb higher and my legs screamed for a break. I finally gave my legs a rest after an hour of climbing, and could only wonder how much further I had to ride before I arrived at a section of flat road.

As I rested for a few minutes, I noticed another cyclist coming up the hill, struggling a lot less than I had been. I waved him down and asked how far back to the main road.

About another 20 kms, and some decent climbing still to come he said as he waved goodbye and continued onward.

Feeling my heart sink a little,and with no other option but to go forward, I got back on the bike and peddled for another hour before I finally hit the main road. By that stage, I was tired, sore and cursing my lack of direction.  But, I had been on an adventure for the day, one I would not forget in a hurry, and neither would my aching legs.

The pain stayed with me until the next day when I headed out for a ride on some more familiar and flatter roads. No harm in mixing up my rides.

My feelings on that morning are summed up in the Talking Heads song. 

Road to Nowhere

 

 

 

Are you listening?

During one of my train trips home, i settled back into a seat opposite an elderly couple, took out my iPhone and headphones and plugged in so I could listen to the sounds of the 80s once again and chill out after another long and frustrating day at the office.

Even though I had my music playing, it was on low enough to overhear the following  conversation between the elderly couple.

Wife: Hand me your phone.
Husband looks at her for a moment and hands phone over to his wife.

Wife plays on the phone for a few moments and then asks. Have you changed the password to the website?

Husband: Looking a little annoyed. No. I tried getting in and the password didn’t work so I tried to change it.

Wife: Shakes her head and sighs out loudly. So you changed it?

Husband: No. I tried and still couldn’t get in.

Wife: What did you change the password to?

Husband: Summer25

Wife: Now very agitated. So you changed it to Summer25?

Husband: No. I tried to change it but it failed.

Wife tries new password and it works.

Wife: You changed the password.

Husband: No. I tried to change the password.

Wife: The password is now Summer25

Husband: Looking a little confused. When did the password change?

Wife shakes her head and hands phone back.

Breaking rules 

There are times you just need to break out of your shell and do something you know isn’t always right. As was the case on my morning ride along the bay and up to Point Nepean.

The road stops about 3 kms short to the most westerly point on the Mornington peninsula and to some sights only seen by a getting there on foot or by shuttle bus. No bikes allowed! As if…

Well, today was the day I would finally see the sights it had offer. A few of the guys I ride with have been down there and recommended the short sharp ride for the views.

The very quick ride down was a little more painful than i anticipated as I mis judged a corner and ended up in a pile of soft sand. No damage to the bike and a cut and bloodied knee for my efforts.

Finally at the bottom, the views were incredible as was the atmosphere of just standing so close to the breaking waves and the feel of the light breeze in a place where I knew I shouldn’t be.

The ride back was harder than I expected, and by the time I reached the top, my legs were burning and felt every downward stroke of my pedals. But the pain was worth the view and the serenity.

Some rules are meant to be bent a little, and not broken.

AC/DC – Breaking the rules

Lies. Everyone Lies!

People lie.

Kids lie to their parents. Workers lie to their managers.

Partners lie to on another.

Everyone lies. It’s plain and simple.

This was quite obvious earlier this year as I was cycling along the peninsula with Action Man while we searched for the Legend so we could ride down to Sorrento together as a pack.

We stopped off on a corner, which just so happened to be the location of a cafe. And as per normal, there were a couple of cyclists sitting down and enjoying a well earned cafe latte.

As we started chatting, one of them lit up a cigarette and casually smoked as we continued our conversation. I finally asked the smoker how often he smoked. His response stumped me.

I only smoke when I go out cycling on the weekends. We do an easy 40 kms, find a cafe, have a couple of coffees as I have a few ciggies and then head home. My wife asks me every now and again if I smoke at work, which I don’t. So I tell her I don’t smoke.

So not sure how to respond, I left him and his Jive Talkin.  I said my farewells and headed back onto the road for another 70 kms with Action Man.

All in all the ride was great, and I did stop off for a coffee near the end of the journey. But no cigarette.

Jive Talking – The Bee Gees

No Lies – Noiseworks 

The Past Does Not Dictate Our Future

No matter what we do in our lives, we will always have a past. Our past may at times come back and haunt us for the things we did when we were young and foolish.

Other times our past lingers in our thoughts and weighs heavily on our minds. The mistakes we made are exactly that. Mistakes.

We need to forgive ourselves as we are only human and we are here to learn from our mistakes. And that is something we need to do a lot better. But we are slowly learning that we can forgive ourselves.

We are born to make mistakes. To err is human, to really screw things up requires a computer.

It takes longer for us to forgive ourselves than it does for others to forgive us for our blunder. We are much harder on ourselves than our friends and loved ones are.

No matter what we think of ourselves, others see us in a different light, they see all our flaws, but they also see the things that shine bright in us, the things we are unable to see, or don’t want to see. Or are to scared to see.

The past does not dictate out future. We are the only ones who can shape our lives after our mistakes. We can’t turn back time, so let’s live with the future. 

Take me back

I tend to spend a few hours at a time on the bike and manage to listen to a lot of music. Albeit that most of the tracks are from the 80s, but they keep me singing along and keep a smile on my dial. The tracks tend to help me grind out the kms and keep the last of my sanity intact. Most of the tracks I listen to take me back to the days when songs had more meaning and not every second word was an obscenity.

So when ‘Take Me Back’ by Noiseworks blasted its way through my headphones, it made think of the words Jon Stevens penned and what they really meant.

Don’t take friends, family or lovers you have for granted, you may lose them forever in the blink of an eye and will never have the opportunity to tell them what you want, or truly feel.

Live for the moment, be spontaneous with them, be with them and enjoy their good times, console them in their bad times. Talk to them and tell them how you feel, because tomorrow may be too late.

Sometimes tomorrow never comes.

‘I watched you wave goodbye as you drove away

I didn’t know that it would be your last time with me

You said – life ain’t worth living if nobody cared

You said it all the time’

Talk and listen. Make the most of every second you’re with the ones who matter the most.