Looking at the big picture


After not having worked for nearly 5 months due to my accident, it was with relief and trepidation that I would return to my old team and the project I was forced to leave.

Heading back in for my first day was something of a relief, but as the train neared my city station. The butterflies in my stomach began their war dance the nerves and jitters hit home.


Not that I should have had any concerns about what my role was and If I was still capable of processing all the information which would be dumped in my lap over the coming weeks. It was more if my mind would be able to cope with the social part of the job.

Friendship and caffeine got me through the day, only just. I was so exhausted on the trip home and struggled to stay awake, hoping I wouldn’t fall asleep and miss my station.

I have been back a few days now and it’s getting easier. And it will eventually be a normality for me in the coming weeks.

My life has become much busier now that I’m back at work. I still need to continue with all my rehabilitation exercises, get to hydrotherapy and see the physio a few times a week.


Busy weeks ahead, but at least I’m moving in the right direction. And that forward direction will continue. Going backwards is not an option. Not now. Not ever.

As my physio said. ‘You broke your back in a cycling accident less than 5 months ago. And you’re going back to work. Don’t be so hard on yourself.’

As much as his words made perfect sense, it’s still tough at times to see the big picture. And that’s something we all need to do.

Missed opportunities 


Some things slip through our fingers when we least expect them. It’s after the event we realise how much of a missed opportunity it really was.


We can’t go back and relive what we missed out on, but we can make amends by having another go at the opportunity which slid past us at a rapid rate of knots.

Some of the missed opportunities we can only blame ourselves for, while others are taken away, leaving us with a longing for what we missed.


This was the case earlier this year for me, a trip to Europe, starting in France and then through to Italy to visit family. But, due to a negligent driver, my trip was cancelled due to injuries incurred, and so were my dreams of sipping coffee and eating freshly made croissants in the very heart of Paris.


Just because I missed out on this opportunity, it doesn’t mean it won’t happen in the future. All that’s needed is some spare time and holiday planning.

So when an opportunity is missed, it’s not the end of the world. Get up and have another shot at it. We only live once and deserve to be happy, and to make the most of every moment.


Don’t wait, enjoy life, it may be taken away in the blink of an eye.

On the road again


After more than five months of having to rely on family, friends and taxi drivers, I’m finally able to get behind the wheel of a car and take myself wherever I want or need. 

The first place I drove was to Maccas and grabbed myself a latte. The trip was easy enough, and it’s like riding a bike. Something you don’t forget easily. 


My visits to physio and the pool will be much easier from now on. And I also feel it’s one more step in the right direction for my rehabilitation. 

As for getting back on my bike, that’s still a few months away. Slowly but surely. 

Coffee break. Time to think 

Sitting in a local coffee shop sipping on a hot vanilla latte and watching the cold winter wind push a few stray leaves along the footpath.  

Not a bad way to spend a some time. Drinking coffee and contemplating life and what it has left to offer. 

With everything that has happened over the past few months, time is the one thing I’ve had plenty of. Time and not much to do except think and assess the situation. 

It could have been worse, much worse. But it seems that time is healing most of the hurt I’ve been feeling. And only more time will heal all wounds. So I’m hoping. 

You don’t know what you’ve got till its gone 

Take a look around. Look at what you have at home, the car you drive, the friends you have, and the freedom that surrounds you. And now, for a few moments, close your eyes and imagine that it’s all taken away, or even just some of. How would you feel? Disappointed, heartbroken, or lost?

This is something that happened to me over the past few months. I haven’t lost anything from my home, nor has my car been towed away, never to be seen again. But my bike is no longer rideable.
I still have my friends and family, and they are a huge part of my life, in so many ways. But what has been taken away from me, is my freedom.

The freedom to get on my road bike and ride to either a preselected destination, or to hit the road and follow a path less traveled. I miss the wind in my face, the speed beneath my wheels, and I miss the comradery with the cyclists who I shared the roads with.

I also miss the simple thing in life, being able to pick up a cup of coffee with my right hand and not feeling a sharp pain in my shoulder. But I still get my coffee, so there is a positive.

Having to ask family to drive me to any place I need to go, or when they are not around, I need to catch a taxi. And I have already had my rant about my love for taxi drivers.

We take so many things for granted, and we only realise how much they really mean to us once they are gone. Hang on tight to what’s close to your heart, because it can be gone forever in the blink of an eye, and there is no way to get it back.

Don’t it always seem to go
That you don’t know what you’ve got til its gone

Joni Mitchell – Big Yellow Taxi

Coffee, muffin and more hills 

Cycling through the Dandenongs is tough at the best of times, and heading up The  Devils Elbow with a stiff headwind makes the ride harder than it really should be. But it was on my radar for the day and  I wasn’t going to let the winds make me change my route. 

The warm morning sun was a blessing as the temperature up in the hills make the ride feel much longer as I can’t produce enough speed to keep all my body parts warm. 

But as I ground my way up the hill, and kept telling my legs to shut up, I realized I hadn’t ridden this track all that often this year. Not because of the climb itself, but because it’s a bit out of the way to ride to and the round trip can take over three hours. That normally includes a coffee stop of course. 

And after two hours of climbing hills and various slopes, I pulled up to a The Fat Badger cafe and ordered a coffee and a very sweet muffin. My treat after a bit of suffering. 

So as I sipped in my coffee and happily munched on my warm muffin, it dawned on me that every now and again in our lives, we should take the road less traveled. 

 Who know where it will lead, and what new adventures await.

This track sums it up nicely. Well worth a listen. 

Donuts beat Depression 

There are times that just the steady rotation of a set of bike pedals is enough to soothe the soul and make the heart beat a little quicker, from exertion and excitement. This feeling is doubled when a ride is shared with a friend who manages to chat through the entire 3.5 hour ride. Not that I minded one iota.

The destination is not important when out on the bike, it’s all about the journey, as is life in general. We all know where we will end up, but it’s what we do up to the point that makes the difference.

So during the journey on a ride, it’s who you meet along the way that makes a difference. As was the case today. As Kevin and I stopped off for a break at the end of the eastlink trail, we started chatting with an older chap who was out exercising that morning. 

He told us he exercises up to 2 hours every day, and at the ripe young age of 70, he was going great. The top tip he gave up both, eat less to lose weight. And then went on to apologise if he had offended either one of us.

With no offence taken, we headed home to find a coffee shop which served good coffee and sugary delights to help get us all the way home.

Cycling is more than just exercise, it is a form of stress management for many people. So when you see a group of cyclists on the road, they are saving a few bucks by riding, and not visiting a shrink.

Depression (or known as the Black Dog) is something that is well hidden by the person who has it. They will swear black and blue they are fine and nothing is wrong. But deep down they are hurting and either can’t or don’t want to adit they have a problem.

Ask them if they are really OK, as sometimes a friend’s shoulder is just as good, and if not better than a paid professional.