Looking at the big picture


After not having worked for nearly 5 months due to my accident, it was with relief and trepidation that I would return to my old team and the project I was forced to leave.

Heading back in for my first day was something of a relief, but as the train neared my city station. The butterflies in my stomach began their war dance the nerves and jitters hit home.


Not that I should have had any concerns about what my role was and If I was still capable of processing all the information which would be dumped in my lap over the coming weeks. It was more if my mind would be able to cope with the social part of the job.

Friendship and caffeine got me through the day, only just. I was so exhausted on the trip home and struggled to stay awake, hoping I wouldn’t fall asleep and miss my station.

I have been back a few days now and it’s getting easier. And it will eventually be a normality for me in the coming weeks.

My life has become much busier now that I’m back at work. I still need to continue with all my rehabilitation exercises, get to hydrotherapy and see the physio a few times a week.


Busy weeks ahead, but at least I’m moving in the right direction. And that forward direction will continue. Going backwards is not an option. Not now. Not ever.

As my physio said. ‘You broke your back in a cycling accident less than 5 months ago. And you’re going back to work. Don’t be so hard on yourself.’

As much as his words made perfect sense, it’s still tough at times to see the big picture. And that’s something we all need to do.

Light at the end of the tunnel 


As the days, weeks and months all slowly slipped by, my rehabilitation continued to become more intense as did all my exercise sessions.

With each passing week, I found I was able to move a little easier and my days weren’t filled with pain and my body was recovering. Slowly, but nonetheless recovering.

So as I continued my journey to full recovery, I continued to look for the light at the end of the tunnel. But no matter how much I think I had progressed, the tiny pin prick of a light never seemed to get any bigger.


It was then I was told I should look back through the weeks and months and see how far I had really progressed.

So as I looked back over my shoulder, I could see a tiny light, way back in the distance. It was where my rehabilitation journey had begun. It was just as far as the light in front of me, where I was heading.

The hardest part of any journey is the middle part. You are far enough from your starting point, and just as far from your destination. Frustrating, but you know you are heading in the right direction.


It’s times like these where you need to be a ‘bit of a mongrel’ and attack the last part of the journey with guts and determination. It’s going to be the only way to make it through the tunnel and out to the other side.

I know the my own journey still has a long way to go, but I do know what awaits me when I eventually arrive at my destination.


We all need to set our sights on that pin prick of a light at the end of the tunnel. And we can do that with the help and support from the people around us, who want us to get out of the dark tunnel.

Cradle to the grave 


With every passing day, we see ourselves and the people around us a little differently. Some good, some bad, and some indifferent. But we continue on our journey, through life, not always certain how it will turn out.


We owe it to ourselves to alter the path of our journey to ensure we keep smiling and stay happy. And with happiness on our side, we have a better chance of a happy ending. One we can take all the way to the grave.


From the cradle to the grave, our choices are not always our own. In our younger years we rely heavily on our parents, as they guide us through our childhood and into our teenage years. Even then our parents are there for us, if we want them or not. But they are there, because of the love they have for us, which is sometimes displayed in some very strange ways at times.

Then as the years continue to slide by and we enter our senior years, we then rely on our children to ensure we are safe and looked after as our health declines.

It truly is the circle of life. So within that circle, we need to embrace all we are given and take every opportunity live a full and happy life.


The real purpose of life is to be happy and we should do all we can, everyday to achieve that goal.

Leave The Light On For Me


When I was young and wild, at least I thought I was a wild child, I would be out every Friday and Saturday night, but unlike the youth of today, I would end up back at my parent’s house, and in my own bed, and well and truly before dawn.

There are a few reasons for my actions, one was that pubs and clubs stopped serving alcohol at 2 am and they shut up for the night. Unlike nowadays where patrons can continue drinking well past sunrise.

The other reason was that my Mother always threatened to rent out my bed if I wasn’t home by 3am. Nice threat, but would have never worked.

So when I did get home from a night out with friends, there would always be a light on. The porch light would be shining bright and never be turned off until I was safe and sound and back home.


It was a beacon in the darkness of the street. The street lights only just throwing light near the front of the house.


In many other ways, family and friends can also leave a light on. Not always physically such as a porch light, but they can show the way to a place where you belong. A place where you always want to return.

Make sure you keep a light on for others, as they may sometimes need that light to bring them home.

Chapters Of Our Lives

Sitting in the kitchen and enjoying my morning cup of coffee, I sat quietly, staring out the window and into vacant space.

The radio, tuned to my favourite station, one which played classic tracks from the 80s. The era in which I cut my teeth on in my musical taste. And the music I still listen to whenever I can. On the bike, exercising, or just chilling out.

So as Khe Sanh by Cold Chisel started playing, it very quickly took me back to some of the best years of my younger days. The days and nights were filled with mates, music, booze and friendships that would forever be remembered.

And that’s exactly what I have from those days. Memories. Great memories to be honest.

But as the song faded and came to an end, I felt a tiny string tugging at my heart, making me yearn for years gone by. Memories of love, laughter, success and failure. All good, and bad.

There is no way to get those years back, they are gone, but not forgotten. Never forgotten.

So as life continues to roll on, it’s natural for us to change, to see things differently than we did, not only when we were young and wild, but also the more current years that have slipped by. Some of those years we noticed, and others seemed to meld into one another. Blurred lines.

And with change in our lives, we begin to see things differently. Not in a bad light, just different. We also begin to question if we are where we want to be at that very point.

Our life starts as a blank book, every paragraph, a moment in our lives. Paragraphs become pages, and pages, eventually become chapters.

Each chapter of our lives defines us, and we need to ensure the next chapter is the one we truly want. If we aren’t true to ourselves, our book will never be the one we really wanted to write.

Become the writer of your true self, we all deserve a happy ending and a journry to be enjoyed.

The Heartless Tin Man 

Do we set ourselves up for heartbreak on a daily basis by showing our emotions?


With everything we do in our everyday lives, we can easily hurt ourselves, or one another. This hurt can take the form of a physical injury such as a broken bone, or even a paper cut. Then there are the injuries no one else can see. 

 A broken heart!


This is where the Tin Man may have had it right. He had a tin suit to protect him from physical injuries, and no heart, so there was no chance of feeling the pain of a broken heart, which in most cases hurts more than the very visible injury.

If we had the option to swap places with the Tin Man, what would we do? Continue suffering heartache on a daily basis or take the armour from and hand over our already shattered heart.


But we do need to look deep into our minds, and hearts before we the swap, and look further down the path of life.

Without true heartbreak, we may never find our lifelong partner, and even when we do, there will still be times when the sound of a shattering heart will reverberate in our minds.

Is it all worth the heartache???

You don’t know what you’ve got till its gone 

Take a look around. Look at what you have at home, the car you drive, the friends you have, and the freedom that surrounds you. And now, for a few moments, close your eyes and imagine that it’s all taken away, or even just some of. How would you feel? Disappointed, heartbroken, or lost?

This is something that happened to me over the past few months. I haven’t lost anything from my home, nor has my car been towed away, never to be seen again. But my bike is no longer rideable.
I still have my friends and family, and they are a huge part of my life, in so many ways. But what has been taken away from me, is my freedom.

The freedom to get on my road bike and ride to either a preselected destination, or to hit the road and follow a path less traveled. I miss the wind in my face, the speed beneath my wheels, and I miss the comradery with the cyclists who I shared the roads with.

I also miss the simple thing in life, being able to pick up a cup of coffee with my right hand and not feeling a sharp pain in my shoulder. But I still get my coffee, so there is a positive.

Having to ask family to drive me to any place I need to go, or when they are not around, I need to catch a taxi. And I have already had my rant about my love for taxi drivers.

We take so many things for granted, and we only realise how much they really mean to us once they are gone. Hang on tight to what’s close to your heart, because it can be gone forever in the blink of an eye, and there is no way to get it back.

Don’t it always seem to go
That you don’t know what you’ve got til its gone

Joni Mitchell – Big Yellow Taxi