Expiry Date


Every time we open the fridge or take a look in our pantry, we find items that are close to or past their expiry date. Milk, yoghurt, pasta and even sugar laced cereal has an expiry date.


All these items hit their end of life date before we had time to make the most of what they had to offer us. We let the opportunity slip through our fingers and then realise we should have made the most of the item before it hit its time was over.

But, as with all food items we can venture down to the local supermarket and replenish the old expired stock with some fresh items. And then we are able to sit down to a breakfast of milk and cereal. Hopefully Coco Pops.


Even after restocking the pantry and fridge with fresh items, there is one item with an expiry date that we should all be concerned about. Our very own end of life. Once we hit our expiry date, there is no trip to the supermarket that will help us in anyway.

So with that expiry period at the forefront of my mind of late, I’ve realised that even the simplest things in life can be the most enjoyable. From sipping a latte at my favourite coffee shop or taking a hike through the hilly terrain of some local tracks.


We never know what tomorrow brings, so when we we wake up every morning we should take every single opportunity to make the most of our lives.

Spending time with family, friends and loved ones is never going to be a waste of their time or yours. It will make our time before our expiry date so much more pleasurable and bring a smile to our faces.


Now that I have the opportunity to look back, I realise my end of life date could have easily been 18 March 2017. But I was fortunate enough to see another day.

And with that second opportunity I want to get out and about and do things that will make me smile and understand there is happiness to be found.


If that involves getting on a plane and travelling the globe or one day getting back on the bike and cycling around to areas I never got to do beforehand, then I will be making the most of second opportunity.


Be sure you make the most before your expiry date us reached.

No Promises

There are some promises that are easy to keep, such as, I promise to mow the lawns this weekend, or I promise to fix blocked gutters before it rains again.

Then there are other promises that are more difficult to keep, no matter how hard you try.

One of my promises to my wife was that I would ride safe and be careful every time I went out on the road bike. Rain, blowing winds and sunny days, I would tell her the same thing as she lay in bed and I ventured off for my morning rides.


This was one promise I broke sometime in mid March 2017. My intentions were good and my years on the bike made no difference at all on this bright and sunny Saturday morning along the Melbourne peninsula. My lights were flashing and I was wearing my multicoloured cycling outfit. But still, a broken promise.

Having been on the road for close to an hour, I knew my halfway point for my outing. There was a slight headwind as I headed towards Point Nepean, and I was pushing myself harder than normal. It must have been the fantastic conditions, and I was out on my own and nothing but 80s music streaming through my headphones and a clear mind.

In a split second, my entire life was about to take a tumble for the worse. But it could have been far more serious. So I consider myself extremely lucky. And I was given a lifeline. 

A car coming in the opposite direction performed an illegal turn in front of me. Obviously not having seen me. And I’m not what one would consider a small unit.

With less than a split second to do something. I did the obvious. I hit his front side guard at over 30 kilometres per hour.

The first and only thing that went through my mind was, it’s over. Goodbye!

I flipped over his hood, landing on my arse and then ploughed into his windscreen, shattering it into thousands of pieces with my shoulder. And my journey continued I somersaulted over his car, as I watched my glasses and iPhone fly well ahead of me.

Landing on the ground more than 12 feet away from his car, I later discovered I broke my back. My L4 to be exact. And in thst split second, my life had changed. Forever!


Pain filled every fibre of my body, but for some unknown reason, I was still able to move my arms and legs. A positive sign I thought as I screamed in pain as I was surrounded by some very helpful and concerned bystanders.

The ambulance trip to the Frankston hospital was one without all that much pain, but I would have to say the morphine in my system had a lot to do with that fact.

The next few hours with my wife beside me at the Frankston hospital and then at the Alfred hospital trauma centre were good, bad, anxious, concerning, and the scariest hours of my life.

I was eventually told I had a broken back, but signs were positive because I was able to move my arms and legs. No internal or neauralogical damage, so another positive sign.

After leaving the hospital five days later, and in a very uncomfortable back brace I was to wear for the following 12 weeks. In some desperate hope my back would heal on its own and no surgery would be required.

With all the damage I had suffered, I was extremely lucky not to have injured any of my spinal nerves and no other nerves impacted. I only have God to thank for that. And not having died on the side of the road was something I still look back at and wonder why?

The following 12 weeks were filled with some of the lowest points in my life. Not just the pain, but the not knowing how and if I would fully recover. And at the lowest point, if I really wanted to continue. I knew deep down I had to abandon all fear if I was to make it through.

With the help and support of family and friends, I struggled through and continued to make progress. First getting out of bed without assistance, and eventually able to walk to my letterbox.

I have to admit ut did get a little easier the more I moved. I ended up going on 5 kilometre walks as the weeks dragged by. My only outings were visits to surgeons and physiotherapists.

The long road of rehabilitation lays ahead of me, 6-12 months I’ve been told before I’m back to the condition I was in before the accident.

In the end, what got me through was love and friendship. And lots of pain medication.

My Scott carbon fibre bike was written off, but I still have my Avanti, which is patiently waiting for me to decide on my path forward.


As for the path after rehabilitation, do I go back to the one sport I loved with a passion, or do I take up stamp collecting, as suggested by my brother.


Whatever I decide, I have honestly found that love and friendship conquers all, physical and mental pain.

No Promises – Icehouse

The good and bad of us

The way we see ourselves is much different than the way others see us. We are seen in a different light, one which we would never think about ourselves.

We always look down upon at what and who we are, and only see our bad side. Our true friends also see our bad side, but they see the side of us that makes us different, and also very special. The side of us that keeps them coming back, through the good times and the bad.

We may not think much of ourselves most of the time, but once in a while we need to see what others see in us. We are all good, we just need to look a little deeper to see the goodness other people see in us. It will shine through.

We shouldn’t let out our self doubt block out all the good things we truly are. 
Relax, smile and our true selves will be revealed not only to those around us, but to ourselves. 

The Past Does Not Dictate Our Future

No matter what we do in our lives, we will always have a past. Our past may at times come back and haunt us for the things we did when we were young and foolish.

Other times our past lingers in our thoughts and weighs heavily on our minds. The mistakes we made are exactly that. Mistakes.

We need to forgive ourselves as we are only human and we are here to learn from our mistakes. And that is something we need to do a lot better. But we are slowly learning that we can forgive ourselves.

We are born to make mistakes. To err is human, to really screw things up requires a computer.

It takes longer for us to forgive ourselves than it does for others to forgive us for our blunder. We are much harder on ourselves than our friends and loved ones are.

No matter what we think of ourselves, others see us in a different light, they see all our flaws, but they also see the things that shine bright in us, the things we are unable to see, or don’t want to see. Or are to scared to see.

The past does not dictate out future. We are the only ones who can shape our lives after our mistakes. We can’t turn back time, so let’s live with the future. 

What’s in a name 

With the sun streaming down onto my back, I kept my rolling legs over and letting the kms zip code by as the heat of the day began to set in. The day was meant to be a warm one, so with 70kms under my belt, I took one last drink break at Safety Beach before tackling the last 10 kms home.

As I stood against the old wooden seats and let my eyes take in the beauty of the water as it gently lapped against the well worn shore. Sipping from my near empty water bottle, I heard the scampering of feet close by.

As I turned around, I saw an elderly gentleman ease himself into the seat closest to me. I smiled and commented on the weather and then if he and his dog we’re enjoying their morning walk.

It was when I looked at the faithful dog standing next to him, it was a shock to the eyes that I saw he only had three legs, missing a hind leg, but managed to get around easily enough.

I bent down to pat the dog, and he accepted my hand and the scratches behind his floppy ears. As I continued to scratch him, I looked up at the owner and asked what happened.

His response tugged at my heart.

I’ve had him for 20 years now. When he was 12 years old, they found a tumor in his back leg. They told me he could be saved if the leg was removed with the tumor.

He was my only friend. My wife had passed away a number of years before and he was the only family I had left. The operation was going to be expensive, and I didn’t have the spare cash. So I did what anyone would do to save a family member. I sold my car to raise the money. He got through the operation and the tumor is gone. And I still have my best friend.

As I stood up, I told him I wished people would look after their family as he had looked after his family.

I replaced my bottle into my drink cage and was about to take off.

What’s his name?

He smiled as he replied. ‘Lucky’

After hearing that, I couldn’t wipe the smile off my face for the remainder of the trip home.

A Touch of Generosity

It’s the small things that people do that make them stand out from the rest. And that’s what made this 100km ride even better. 
After 80kms one of the guys dropped back from the group and was losing touch. I don’t like being left behind so I eased off and stayed with him. 
Once we got to some shade, we stopped off for a bite to eat and a drink. It was there that a young mother came out from her house and asked it we wanted our water bottles refilled with ice water. We both accepted the offer and then continued on our way. Bottles filled with ice water and blocks of ice.
It made riding the remainder 20kms so much easier and ensured I had a smile on my face.  

It’s the simple things that keep my faith in people. This act proved my point.