I’m only human. Flesh and blood

No matter the color of our skin, we are all the same. We are all flesh and blood, skin and bones, muscle and tissue. So in reality, this means we are all prone to the same injuries and illnesses. And is saying that, we are all going to die at some point.

So it doesn’t matter whether we are black or white, or any shade in between, there is good and bad in everyone of us, and the hope that good outshines the bad is something we all want. But in saying this, there are people out there that only want to cause harm and pain to others around them. Some intentional, and other pain, very unintentional. But pain nonetheless.

With knowing that the colour of our skin has no direct impact on what we do in our lives, we are all prone to screwing up and doing one thing that will weigh heavily on our minds. Sometimes for a short while after, or other times that screw-up will stay with us for the remainder of our living years, until we take our last breath. We all make mistakes as our mental programming is similar. None of us can claim to be perfect. No matter what we think of ourselves.

Now knowing we are all programmed in the same way and should be able to forgive others of their discretions. which we do at some point. We also know that the people around us screw up, and we normally manage to forgive them for what they have done. Sometimes the pain takes longer to fade, but it does. And in the end we can forgive. Even if the memory stays firmly lodged in the back of of minds.

So, if we can eventually forgive others for the things they do and say that cause us pain, why can’t we forgive ourselves for the things we do to others? The ones we somehow hurt can eventually forgive us, but we cant let go of what we have done and are unable to cut ourselves some slack and let the past be exactly that. The past.

But sometimes it’s easier said than done. We continue turning over our ‘bad’ deeds in our minds, and don’t let them fade into the deepest part of our memory banks. Not that we should ever forget our mistakes, but they should not control our lives from the moment the mistake was made, until the moment we die.

When we reach the point in our lives where we know we need to let go of a memory, what can we do? We can’t just erase the memory, like they do with memories in the movie Total Recall. If we don’t like the current memories we have, we simply can’t have another one implemented. As good as an idea as that sounds, it’s not going to happen. At least not in my lifetime.

So what do we do? We can ask for forgiveness, but that may have already been given. In the end, we are the only ones who can let go of the memories that are weighing us down. These memories are the ones that are possibly causing more stress, pain and bitterness to others than the actual ‘bad’ deed itself.

Kindness and understanding from the people around us will make a difference. It may take time, but time is all we have.

I’m only human. Flesh and blood

No matter the color of our skin, we are all the same. We are all flesh and blood, skin and bones, muscle and tissue. So in reality, this means we are all prone to the same injuries and illnesses. And is saying that, we are all going to die at some point.

So it doesn’t matter whether we are black or white, or any shade in between, there is good and bad in everyone of us, and the hope that good outshines the bad is something we all want. But in saying this, there are people out there that only want to cause harm and pain to others around them. Some intentional, and other pain, very unintentional. But pain nonetheless.

With knowing that the colour of our skin has no direct impact on what we do in our lives, we are all prone to screwing up and doing one thing that will weigh heavily on our minds. Sometimes for a short while after, or other times that screw-up will stay with us for the remainder of our living years, until we take our last breath. We all make mistakes as our mental programming is similar. None of us can claim to be perfect. No matter what we think of ourselves.

Now knowing we are all programmed in the same way and should be able to forgive others of their discretions. which we do at some point. We also know that the people around us screw up, and we normally manage to forgive them for what they have done. Sometimes the pain takes longer to fade, but it does. And in the end we can forgive. Even if the memory stays firmly lodged in the back of of minds.

So, if we can eventually forgive others for the things they do and say that cause us pain, why can’t we forgive ourselves for the things we do to others? The ones we somehow hurt can eventually forgive us, but we cant let go of what we have done and are unable to cut ourselves some slack and let the past be exactly that. The past.

But sometimes it’s easier said than done. We continue turning over our ‘bad’ deeds in our minds, and don’t let them fade into the deepest part of our memory banks. Not that we should ever forget our mistakes, but they should not control our lives from the moment the mistake was made, until the moment we die.

When we reach the point in our lives where we know we need to let go of a memory, what can we do? We can’t just erase the memory, like they do with memories in the movie Total Recall. If we don’t like the current memories we have, we simply can’t have another one implemented. As good as an idea as that sounds, it’s not going to happen. At least not in my lifetime.

So what do we do? We can ask for forgiveness, but that may have already been given. In the end, we are the only ones who can let go of the memories that are weighing us down. These memories are the ones that are possibly causing more stress, pain and bitterness to others than the actual ‘bad’ deed itself.

Kindness and understanding from the people around us will make a difference. It may take time, but time is all we have.

The path to heaven is full of sinners and believers


If I had to sit back and think through my life and where I will end up, I would struggle to come up with an answer. Apart from the obvious one, in a pine box and six foot under.
On the long and winding road we call life, we come across many people, some sinners, and others believers. These people cross our paths for a specific reason, even if we don’t realise it at the time.


It may take months, or sometimes even years to understand why we these people ventured into our lives. They may have been with us for the briefest of moments or stayed with us for years, and are possibly still in our lives.

But sometimes it’s the people who come into our lives for the shortest period of time that make the most impact, or leave us wondering why we were with them for such a short time.

There is no simple answer to this, but most likely they came into our lives for a single purpose. They knowingly or unknowingly achieved what they were meant to do and then drifted off.

We can believe what we want, but the sinners in our lives are with us to make us see the grass on the other side. And it’s up to us to decide if we want to jump the fence and see if the grass really is the right shade of green other side and if it’s what we really want. Sometimes it is, and other times the grass has dried out lost its lush greenery.


Then there are the believers who come into our lives. Just like the sinners, they have shown up for a reason. That reason may be to show us we are worth more than we think we are and we are not a burden to others, as we may sometimes think.

Apart from having sinners and believers in our lives, we also need to follow the path we truly believe, either go and check out greener pastures by jumping the fence, or believing we are better than what we think.

No matter which path we take, it will all end in a pine box.


So while we wait to lay in that pine box, we need to enjoy the journey and do what’s best for us, even if others don’t agree with our descisions.

No Promises

There are some promises that are easy to keep, such as, I promise to mow the lawns this weekend, or I promise to fix blocked gutters before it rains again.

Then there are other promises that are more difficult to keep, no matter how hard you try.

One of my promises to my wife was that I would ride safe and be careful every time I went out on the road bike. Rain, blowing winds and sunny days, I would tell her the same thing as she lay in bed and I ventured off for my morning rides.


This was one promise I broke sometime in mid March 2017. My intentions were good and my years on the bike made no difference at all on this bright and sunny Saturday morning along the Melbourne peninsula. My lights were flashing and I was wearing my multicoloured cycling outfit. But still, a broken promise.

Having been on the road for close to an hour, I knew my halfway point for my outing. There was a slight headwind as I headed towards Point Nepean, and I was pushing myself harder than normal. It must have been the fantastic conditions, and I was out on my own and nothing but 80s music streaming through my headphones and a clear mind.

In a split second, my entire life was about to take a tumble for the worse. But it could have been far more serious. So I consider myself extremely lucky. And I was given a lifeline. 

A car coming in the opposite direction performed an illegal turn in front of me. Obviously not having seen me. And I’m not what one would consider a small unit.

With less than a split second to do something. I did the obvious. I hit his front side guard at over 30 kilometres per hour.

The first and only thing that went through my mind was, it’s over. Goodbye!

I flipped over his hood, landing on my arse and then ploughed into his windscreen, shattering it into thousands of pieces with my shoulder. And my journey continued I somersaulted over his car, as I watched my glasses and iPhone fly well ahead of me.

Landing on the ground more than 12 feet away from his car, I later discovered I broke my back. My L4 to be exact. And in thst split second, my life had changed. Forever!


Pain filled every fibre of my body, but for some unknown reason, I was still able to move my arms and legs. A positive sign I thought as I screamed in pain as I was surrounded by some very helpful and concerned bystanders.

The ambulance trip to the Frankston hospital was one without all that much pain, but I would have to say the morphine in my system had a lot to do with that fact.

The next few hours with my wife beside me at the Frankston hospital and then at the Alfred hospital trauma centre were good, bad, anxious, concerning, and the scariest hours of my life.

I was eventually told I had a broken back, but signs were positive because I was able to move my arms and legs. No internal or neauralogical damage, so another positive sign.

After leaving the hospital five days later, and in a very uncomfortable back brace I was to wear for the following 12 weeks. In some desperate hope my back would heal on its own and no surgery would be required.

With all the damage I had suffered, I was extremely lucky not to have injured any of my spinal nerves and no other nerves impacted. I only have God to thank for that. And not having died on the side of the road was something I still look back at and wonder why?

The following 12 weeks were filled with some of the lowest points in my life. Not just the pain, but the not knowing how and if I would fully recover. And at the lowest point, if I really wanted to continue. I knew deep down I had to abandon all fear if I was to make it through.

With the help and support of family and friends, I struggled through and continued to make progress. First getting out of bed without assistance, and eventually able to walk to my letterbox.

I have to admit ut did get a little easier the more I moved. I ended up going on 5 kilometre walks as the weeks dragged by. My only outings were visits to surgeons and physiotherapists.

The long road of rehabilitation lays ahead of me, 6-12 months I’ve been told before I’m back to the condition I was in before the accident.

In the end, what got me through was love and friendship. And lots of pain medication.

My Scott carbon fibre bike was written off, but I still have my Avanti, which is patiently waiting for me to decide on my path forward.


As for the path after rehabilitation, do I go back to the one sport I loved with a passion, or do I take up stamp collecting, as suggested by my brother.


Whatever I decide, I have honestly found that love and friendship conquers all, physical and mental pain.

No Promises – Icehouse

Mistakes make us human 


With all the things we do in our lives, we are bound to make a mistake or two. Or, sometimes a lot more. We can normally let some of our mistakes slide by, while with some others, we need to fess up and take responsibility for what we’ve done.

It’s not always easy to own up to what we have done, but sometimes it’s easier in the long run to dig deep and confess. Rather than keeping it all bottled up and waiting for it to explode deep inside of us, and tearing us apart. 


One of the hardest things to do is to admit to a friend or a loved one you have made a mistake that can change everything you have. 

The longer it takes to admit it to yourself, and then to others you have screwed up, the harder it will be to get over it and continue making amends.

Take the plunge and own up to your mistakes. It will change your life, And hopefully for the best.

Heading in the right direction


We need to look deeper into our hearts and minds to really discover what we want from our future. A quick scan will more than likely miss what we are truly thinking. And that’s when we head off in the wrong direction.
The direction we take can impact us for longer than we want. An entire lifetime. But how do know what direction is really right for us?

There is normally one path that shines brighter than all the others. This is the obvious path. Or is it?

We will only know if we are on the right path once we have cleared our minds of everything else except for the path that lays ahead, and are certain there is no other way forward.


Once we know the right path, there is no sense in wasting time and procrastinating about the choice we are about to make.

Take that step into the right direction, your heart and mind will thank you forever.

Renée Geyer – Heading in the right direction

Signs – Pointing us in the right direction

Cycling, walking and life all have one thing in common. There are signs around us to tell us which way to go, what turn to take and where our destination lies. And if   that’s the direction we want to head, we need to follow the right signs. 
Some signs are easy to see, as they are posted on steeet corners or smack bang with in the middle of the road, making sure they are visible to one and all, whether we are on foot or on a bike. 

But there are times we avoid these signs and end up either lost, or so far away from our destination, we wonder why we didn’t follow them in the first place. Or why we completely ignored them in the first place. 

It seems that street signs are the easiest ones to see and follow, if we choose to follow them and continue heading in the right direction.

On the other hand, signs in our lives can be a little more subtle and take time, and sometimes a very open heart to see, and then fully understand. 

We need to look out for these signs that will keep us moving in the direction and ensure we follow the right path that will guarantee our happiness in the journey we want, and need to pursue. 


And then there are signs which can’t be ignored, like the one at Maccas stating that all Maccaroons are half price with any coffee purchase.  How could I ignore this one. 


Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign-Five – Man Electric Band