The Road Less Traveled

With another ride all planned out for the day, I headed down the peninsula and towards a ride that always makes me wonder why I keep attempting it on a regular basis. Arthur’s Seat is a 4.5 km ride that ensures my legs are screaming for mercy, half way up. It’s at that point I keep asking myself. Why?

The reason I keep pushing myself up the hill is for the views from the top, and they are spectacular. No matter what the weather, rain or shine, the pain from the ride always seems worthwhile. Well, in my mind it seems worth the effort.

 

So on this particular ride, I decided to take an alternate route home, one which I had only ridden once, and it was with another rider who knew the area like the back of his hand. With a certain clarity, I headed down the back roads that I thought would eventually take me back to the main road and to some semi flat tracks.

The trip back down should have taken no longer than 15 minutes, so when I was still riding along a road that didn’t look very familiar, I did what most men would do, keep going until a sign post came by to look for further directions.

I knew I was well off the beaten track after another 45 minutes, but the views on both sides of the road were well worth the pedal power, and the roads were all rolling  hills, so I assumed the remainder of the trip home would have similar gradients. How wrong could I have been?

After finally finding a road name that was very familiar, I headed in the direction of home, having already been out on the road for over 90 minutes, so I estimated another 60 minutes on the road. Another bad judgment call.

The next two hours saw me riding through some of the toughest and longest hills I had cycled through in a long while.  With every turn, the road continued to climb higher and my legs screamed for a break. I finally gave my legs a rest after an hour of climbing, and could only wonder how much further I had to ride before I arrived at a section of flat road.

As I rested for a few minutes, I noticed another cyclist coming up the hill, struggling a lot less than I had been. I waved him down and asked how far back to the main road.

About another 20 kms, and some decent climbing still to come he said as he waved goodbye and continued onward.

Feeling my heart sink a little,and with no other option but to go forward, I got back on the bike and peddled for another hour before I finally hit the main road. By that stage, I was tired, sore and cursing my lack of direction.  But, I had been on an adventure for the day, one I would not forget in a hurry, and neither would my aching legs.

The pain stayed with me until the next day when I headed out for a ride on some more familiar and flatter roads. No harm in mixing up my rides.

My feelings on that morning are summed up in the Talking Heads song. 

Road to Nowhere

 

 

 

What’s in a name?

bond-full

Why is it that so many people insist on wearing their name badges from the seminar they are attending out onto the street for one and all to see? The only valid reason that springs to mind is that these people are in desperate need of a date and would like to be asked out for a coffee or lunch. Better still, perhaps a night out on the town and then a raunchy weekend for two.

But that is more than likely my imagination running rampant once again. It is more likely that they are too lazy to remove their badges and pin them back on once they return to the seminar.

One such badge caught my attention one day as I wandered the city streets in search of nothing in particular. It was when I stopped at a set of traffic lights and I caught sight of the very large badge pinned to his multi-striped shirt. Actually, it wasn’t the badge that really caught my attention, but it was his name that made me smirk.

The badge read ‘Timmy Smelles’. Not that there is anything wrong with his name, but you would think that he wouldn’t try and live up to his surname.

Even though it was a warm day, I wouldn’t say it was what one would call sweating weather. But Timmy had different ideas. Not only was he sweating, he smelt as he had been sweating for more than a few minutes. Nothing that a stick of anti-perspirent wouldn’t fix, or at least go half way to making him smell a bit better.

Well, that’s my spin on the situation anyway.

On another note in regards to name tags, I only just found out that name tags should be pinned onto the right hand side of the body and not the left, where most people tend to pin them.

The logic behind this is clear and simple (once it has been explained). When someone introduces themselves, they shake with their right hand. The line of vision will automatically follow the arm and stop at their name tag, making it easier for identification.

I should thank the little lady of the house for that bit of information. I can’t take credit for everything. Now can I?